BlackBerry needs to ‘think different’

This morning the guy sat across from me was using a BlackBerry Passport.  I don’t see them very often so I’ve gotten in to the habit of asking their owners whether they like the odd-looking handset.  While some are slightly embarrassed by the attention they have all, without exception, gone on to tell me it is the best handset they’ve ever owned.

“It’s better than an iPhone”, I was told this morning.  “Better than any of my friends’ Android devices” he continued. “But I’m a BlackBerry fanboy”.  Not words I hear very often these days.

“But they don’t sell the Passport very well.  They don’t tell people how their phones are better than iOS and Android handsets.  If people knew what it did they might sell more.  These days when people see I use a Passport it raises some eyebrows”

And there in lies the problem.  Nobody takes the company seriously anymore.  It’s a troubled company with more attempts at recovering its lost dominance that most people assume the company has failed.  Nobody knows what the company stands for these days.  Who its devices are for.  Why anybody should care.

To have any chance of survival it needs to fix this.  Failing to fix it will make everything else it does a complete waste of time.  It doesn’t matter how many new handsets it launches; keyboard or no keyboard; BlackBerry OS or Android.  BlackBerry needs people to know what it stands for and who its devices are designed for.

“If you’re thinking of a phone for business then you should definitely seriously consider it”.

I am.  Despite my criticism of the company’s marketing and PR activities, I really am. There are more like me – but BlackBerry needs to give them a reason to choose Blackberry.      It needs a think different campaign – and it needs it quickly.

 

Blackberry iPhone Switch Deal Shows Nothing Has Changed

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BlackBerry wants you to think that it has changed.  Its Black Friday deal demonstrates it hasn’t.  It’s bad news for the Waterloo, Ontario based company and is yet another example of how the company continues to get its PR and marketing wrong – to the detriment of the company.

The company is offering iPhone users up to $550 if they switch to a Passport on of after December 1.  The chances of persuading many to ‘trade up’ is slim. iPhone users are unlikely to switch – and $550 incentives is not going to be enough to persuade those that could be swayed to give up their shiny i device.

If BlackBerry had a clear business and communications strategy designed to bring users back to its devices, it would realize that iPhone users are not their target audience. The company should, instead, be offering entrepreneurs and small businesses incentives to choose the BlackBerry passport. These are the people who will get most value from the companies devices.  They are also customers that, once captured, are likely to be long-term and loyal.

Until BlackBerry figures out who its customer is, understands the value it delivers to them, develops a long-term strategic plan to communicate this to them, and build long-term mutually beneficial relationship with them the company will continue to flounder.

Read more about BlackBerry’s Marketing and Public Relations Disaster

Startup and SmallBiz PR and marketing tip: focus on the people that value what your do, rather than chasing those that don’t.

How To Measure Success of Public Relations

Ask most PR professionals and they’ll tell you that measuring the value of public relations is hard to express.  As a result, they’ll say, it’s hard to be specific about the value they deliver.  The return on your investment is affected by so many variables it is hard to be able to give you tangible outcomes.

It’s all a lie.  Here’s how to measure the success of public relations.  It’s all in the strength of the relationships build or maintained as a result of your PR activities. We do it every day in our private lives, so why do we find it so difficult to do it in our businesses?

Think about the most important people to your business right now.  Do you have relationships with them at all?  If not, they score a zero.

Of the people you have relationships with how strong are those connections?  Would they drop everything to help you if you asked them to?  Would they willingly do everything within their power to help your business overcome its current challenge?  Will they go to bat for you if you needed them to? Will they introduce you to people within their network that may have a need for your product or service? Will they testify to your credibility or vouch for the quality of your work?

If they would then score those relationships a 10.

If they’re not a 10 then you need to figure out where on the scale they are currently.

Perhaps they’re a new connection that will help you with advice, or will provide feedback on your product development.  They might be willing to introduce you to people that are potential customers or partners, but won’t provide a reference or testimonial.  They will help if they can, but you can’t guarantee they’ll come rushing in an emergency.  Would they help if they really were your last hope? What incentive would you need to offer in order to get them to help your business if you needed them to? Do you have direct access to them? Who are the people that you rely on to give you the access you need? Do you loose access to these people without the intermediary?

Make a list of the top ten people your business needs relationships with and score them, between 0 and 10, based on these criteria.  Having benchmarked the relationships that are most important to your business achieving its next milestone you can develop a PR programme designed to build, strengthen, or maintain these relationships.

Measuring the success of your PR activities can then be tracked, based on whether these relationships strengthen, weaken or whether you are able to maintain them until you have achieved your desired outcome.  If you reevaluate each of your ten most important relationships every 30 days you can quickly see the impact that public relations is having on your business.

Startup and SmallBiz PR and marketing tip: benchmark relationship strength and build a plan to ensure you have the ones you need in place.

$BBRY, BlackBerry, Mobile, Telecommunications

BlackBerry has a death wish!

The BlackBerry Passport launches tomorrow. The question is will anybody care?

The company has, yet again, failed to build the relationships it needed to change the perception of the company, and its marketing around the launch of the new handset has been woeful. Again.

I wrote 18 months ago about my launch plan for the company’s BB10 devices and have been reflecting on what I would do differently for Passport. In reality, much of my BB10 remains unimplemented and would have give the company a better chance of success than anything I’ve seen to date.

The only thing I would change from my original plan would be the device cost. Announced yesterday, $599 dollars off contract is too much. A 50 dollar difference between the Passport and the iPhone 6 won’t persuade people to give BlackBerry another chance. Many wouldn’t switch if the price differential was $500. It’s not so much about the handset, although the Passport is an acquired style choice, but about the brand image.

There are those that have claimed, ‘market share is not BlackBerry’s game’. Some have said it’s about margin. Some who say the company is focused on Enterprise, not consumers.

So why even mention the price differential to the competitors? Why mention the comparative size of the screen? Make a clear statement that you’re focused on a different market.

Lastly, and most importantly, BlackBerry has failed to communicate these clearly via PR and marketing to build relationships and get people to take the action you want them to. BlackBerry has failed on all counts and it’s running out of runway.

I wrote almost three years ago that BlackBerry was its own worst enemy.  Nothing I’ve seen since convinces me otherwise!

Startup and SmallBiz PR and marketing tip:  Don’t get distracted by the competition. Don’t be scared to sell on differentiators. Be prepared to trade on the value you deliver in the eyes of your customers and prospects – and if that doesn’t work… it’s over.