Coverage failure

The majority of my sales comes from word of mouth.  People I’ve worked with tell people like them facing similar communications challenges with their businesses recommend my business.  Looking at the Google Analytics for my website the majority of traffic comes directly or via social media – the proportion of social to direct traffic is relatively small – and the amount that comes from third-party sites is even smaller.

I’ve long questioned the logic of editorial coverage and so when one site whose readers are my idea customer demographic started sharing an article I published on their platform I watched with interest.  What would the impact on my inbound leads be?  Would I see any noticeable uptick in traffic?  A surge in new business enquiries? I suspected not.

Before you ask, it wasn’t a one-off.  The site has shared my article on many occasions in the last three months via its twitter account.  It has been retweeted at least 100 times by followers of that account – but yet the traffic it’s delivered to this site has been almost non-existent.  And that’s not a surprise.

If you’ve not read it then I’d encourage you to pick up a copy of Ryan Holiday’s ‘Trust Me, I’m Lying’.  It’s a fascinating insight in to the current state of the media – driven by clicks and page impressions that focus on sensational headlines and opinion, rather than because they have any value to the reader.  In the B2B sector in particular, articles aren’t shared for any reason other than driving traffic to their platform.

So, next time you want to spend thousands of dollars paying a publicity agent to secure you coverage, stop and think. Will it benefit you or the outlet it runs in more?

Want to know more about why traditional media-based PR doesn’t add up? Here’s the math of media coverage

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Why does my content marketing suck? | THINK PR Espresso

I read a piece over the weekend called ‘Why content marketing sucks?‘ and it made me mad. The author makes the point in the piece that content marketing doesn’t suck – she just used the title to get people to read her post.

The irony is that she’s demonstrating, perfectly, the reason that most content marketing sucks. Badly.

The problem is that the action/outcome appears to be to get people to read something, rather than anything that is of value to the individual or business. A link-bait title also sets unrealistic expectations and, invariably, disappoints the reader. How do you feel when somebody wastes your time? How would you feel if somebody hooked you with a sign outside their store offering a 50% discount, only for you to find that once in the store there was no discount, it was simply a tactic to get you in the store?

How likely would you be to do business with a company that operated in that way?

Startup and SmallBiz PR and marketing tip: If you want to improve the quality and effectiveness of your content marketing don’t chase anybody that is willing to click a link. Focus on the people that are likely to become your customers and provide them with valuable content. You might find that when you ask them to take an action – whether it is to share something, buy something or tell others like them about you – they’ll be far more likely to agree.

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BlackBerry: the easy part is over. Now the hard work begins.

Blackberry’s stock has rallied in recent days.  Buoyed by John Chen’s announcement that the restructuring of the company is over, many people have started to talk about turnaround and of better days ahead.  The reality is that the restructure was the easy bit.  The hard part – selling devices and in increasing volumes than in recent years – may yet consign the company to the mobile telecommunications history books.  It’s a part of the jigsaw puzzle that the company has been notably poor at in recent years. 

The nadir being had to be the company’s Super Bowl advert that left many scratching their heads at what they had witnessed.

The Blackberry YouTube account shows more than 1.2 million views – some would claim this to be a success because it created ‘buzz’. But when the advert served no valuable purpose it did far more damage than good.

In order for Blackberry to complete the turnaround that Chen now says he
believes is 80:20 in favor of successfully being executed it needs to retain its existing customer base and start to capture those that have in recent years abandoned the company.   That is going to require a PR and marketing campaign the likes of which the company hasn’t seen for at least a decade.  I’d even suggest it would take a campaign to
rival the one credited with turning around a failing Apple Computer in 1998.
 Blackberry needs to beat the master marketer, Steve Jobs, at his own game.

Before you start, I’m not suggesting that Blackberry go after iPhone customers.
 I think to continue down that path would be the death knell for the company.
 What I’m talking about is something that gives Blackberry diehards, and those
that could be tempted back, a reason to buy a new Blackberry over any of an
increasing number of attractive alternatives.  The company needs to be clear about what it stands for – and why people should care.  

In order to do this the company needs first to identify who its audience is and start to rebuild some of the burned bridges with a PR program.  Its value proposition needs to be clear and its message compelling.  It also needs to deliver it in a consistent way across
multiple platforms, both directly and via traditional, online and social media
channels.  This is something that the company has struggled to do, despite it being one of the most important parts of a successful turnaround.

Unless the company can successfully rebuild relationships and deliver marketing that encourages consumers [B2B or B2C] to take action then the company is doomed, no matter what their financial position is.  They’ll be consigned to the lower leagues of the mobile telecommunications marketplace – something they’ve been trying to avoid ever since Steve Jobs launched the first iPhone.

Do you think Blackberry will make it?

Read my continuing analysis of BlackBerry’s turbulent struggle